Good Agricultural Practices For the Near East & North Africa Countries

Good Agricultural Practices For the Near East & North Africa Countries

Anwar Al Ibrahem, Costas Gregoriou, Mohieddine Ksantini, Saleh Shdiefat, Belkassem Boulouha, Mohamed El-Kholy and Nicos Serafids | View Article Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) is a production approach in which the sequential decisions taken by the producer during the production process on related issues such as what to grow, how to prepare the soil, what plant nutrients to use, how to control weeds, pests, diseases, how to harvests, how to sustain natural resources, protect the ecosystem, etc. With GAP, all such decisions become subject to an analysis of the implications of the choices taken with respect to: food safety, environment, social factors (e.g. labor) and the...
Neofusicoccum luteum associated with leaf necrosis and fruit rot of olives

Neofusicoccum luteum associated with leaf necrosis and fruit rot of olives

Vera Sergeeva, Artur Alves and Alan J.L. Phillips | View Article Neofusicoccum luteum is reported for the first time from olives (Olea europaea), causing fruit rot and leaf necrosis. Affected fruits initially became brown with pycnidia developing on the surface, later drying out and becoming mummified. The fungus was shown to be pathogenic on both fruits and leaves. The association of Botryosphaeriaceae with rotting olive fruits in Mediterranean regions and in New South Wales, Australia indicates that these fungi play a significant role in fruit rots of olives and deserve greater...
Assessing the Susceptibility of Olive Cultivars to Anthracnose

Assessing the Susceptibility of Olive Cultivars to Anthracnose

J. Moral and A. Trapero | View Article Selected olive (Olea europaea) cultivars were tested in the field and laboratory for their relative susceptibility to anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum acutatum. A rating scale to assess fruitrot incidence in naturally infected trees was validated by comparing ratings with direct counts of affected fruit. Fruit-rot incidence varied greatly among 20 cultivars and was correlated with the severity of branch dieback symptoms that developed after fruit-rot...
Different Fungicides Application to Control Olive Leaf Spot

Different Fungicides Application to Control Olive Leaf Spot

Sistani F., Ramezanpour S.S, Nasrollanejad S. | View Article Olea europaea L. is one of the oldest agricultural tree crops which are cultivated in some area especially north of Iran. The olive tree is affected by some pests and diseases such as Olive leaf spot (OLS) which is widespread in all olive growing regions of the world, and has been known in the Mediterranean areas and resulting in fruit drop and decreased oil yields. In this study different fungicides were used to evaluate their efficiency to reduce OLS incidence under field condition. Before fungicide application, Mission variety was the most susceptible and Kroneiki was the most resistant variety to OLS but after using fungicide Rawghani variety showed most reduction in OLS incidence and grouped as most resistant variety. Benomyl as a systemic fungicide, Rovral TS as a combination of systemic (Carbendazim) and non systemic (Ipridion) fungicide and Copper oxychloride showed the most effect to control OLS under field...
Observations on spot caused by Fusicladium oleagineum

Observations on spot caused by Fusicladium oleagineum

V. Sergeeva, U. Braun, R. Spooner-Hart and N. G. Nair | View Article The name Cycloconium oleagineum Castagne = Spilocaea oleaginea (Castagne) S. Hughes has been commonly used for the causal organism of peacock spot disease of olives. However, it is currently assigned to the genus Fusicladium as F. oleagineum (Castagne) Ritschel & U. Braun (= Spilocaea oleaginea (Castagne) S. Hughes) by Schubert et al. (2003). We report F. oleagineum on O. europaea in New South Wales and provide a description of the disease. Peacock spot is also known as olive scab and leaf spot and is widespread in all the major olive growing regions of the world (Obanor et al. 2005). Symptoms have been found to occur mainly on leaves and appear as dark green to black spots surrounded by a yellow halo similar to the eye spot on peacock’s feathers; hence, the name peacock spot (Graniti 1993; Shabi et al....