Verticillium wilt of olive

Verticillium wilt of olive

Francisco Javier López-Escudero & Jesús Mercado-Blanco | View Article Olive (Olea europaea L.) is one of the first domesticated and cultivated tree species and has historical, social and economical relevance. However, its future as a strategic commodity in Mediterranean agriculture is threatened by diverse biotic (traditional and new/emerging pests and diseases) and abiotic (erosion, climate change) menaces. These problems could also be of relevance for new geographical areas where olive cultivation is not traditional but is increasingly spreading (i.e., South America, Australia, etc). One of the major constraints for olive cultivation is Verticillium wilt, a vascular disease caused by the soil-borne fungus Verticillium dahliae Kleb. In this review we describe how Verticillium wilt of olive (VWO) has become a major problem for olive cultivation during the last two...
The influence of pruning methods on insect and disease control

The influence of pruning methods on insect and disease control

Vera Sergeeva and Michael Thomsett | View Article Insect pests and diseases in the olive grove have significant impacts on production and overall tree health, which if not managed with sound horticultural practices can result in significant economic loss to the grower. Olive trees are susceptible to a wide range of pests and diseases, including black scale, olive lace bug, peacock spot, cercosporiose and...
Biological control of olive leaf spot (peacock spot disease)

Biological control of olive leaf spot (peacock spot disease)

Mahmoud Al-Khatib, Khalaf Alhussaen, Nasser El-Banna and Morouj Zyadeh | View Article We report the antifungal activity of eight different bacterial isolates (Bacillus megaterium NB-3, Bacillus cereus NB-4, B. cereus NB-5, Bacillus subtilis NB-6, Corynebacterium xerosis NB-2, Burkholderia mallei NB-8, B. subtilis (HNEB-1) and B. cereus NEB II voru) against the olive leaf spot fungus (Cycloconium oleaginum). B. subtilis NB-6 (6.88 cm2), B. megaterium NB-3 (7.13 cm2), B. subtilis HNEB-1 (7.63 cm2) and B. cereus NB-4(7.88 cm2) were found to control significantly the growth of C. oleaginum, where the strains of C. xerosis NB-2 (12.75 cm2), B. mallei NB-8 (15.63 cm2) and B. cereus NB-5 (16.25 cm2) controlled the fungal growth under the experimental conditions. B. cereus NEBII voru is the only tested bacterial strain that enhanced the fungal growth of C. oleaginum under our experimental conditions (46.25...
From the Olive Tree to Olive Oil, New Trends and Future Challenges

From the Olive Tree to Olive Oil, New Trends and Future Challenges

Vera Sergeeva | View Article New Trends and challenges such as the following and many others: Environmental Stress and Sustainable Olive Growing The Use of the Evapotranspiration Stress Index (ETSI) to Guide Irrigation Management in Young Olives Biennial Bearing in Olive – Physiological Background and Control Effect of Nitrogen Status on Frost Tolerance of Olive Trees Gene Expression Analysis of Olive Tree (Olea europaea L.) in Response to Salt Stress High Temperatures Before Budbreak Inhibits Olive Tree Flower Differentiation but Not Development Quantifying Indicators for Short- Term Water Stress in Juvenile ‘Barnea’ Olives Using Large Weighing-Drainage Lysimeters Transcript Analysis and Metabolome Profiling of Developing Olive Fruit in Relation to Different Water...
Frost and chilling injuries in olives

Frost and chilling injuries in olives

Vera Sergeeva | View Article Nothing gets more discussion among olive growers than when to harvest. Fruit maturation depends, among other things, on olive variety, temperature, sunlight and irrigation. A hot autumn can cause fruit to ripen quickly, resulting in a narrow window for optimum picking. Some varieties will ripen faster than others, and olives may mature later in some parts of the orchard than in others. Some farmers are also forced to pick greener fruit than they want, to hedge against frost...