Observations on spot caused by Fusicladium oleagineum

Observations on spot caused by Fusicladium oleagineum

V. Sergeeva, U. Braun, R. Spooner-Hart and N. G. Nair | View Article The name Cycloconium oleagineum Castagne = Spilocaea oleaginea (Castagne) S. Hughes has been commonly used for the causal organism of peacock spot disease of olives. However, it is currently assigned to the genus Fusicladium as F. oleagineum (Castagne) Ritschel & U. Braun (= Spilocaea oleaginea (Castagne) S. Hughes) by Schubert et al. (2003). We report F. oleagineum on O. europaea in New South Wales and provide a description of the disease. Peacock spot is also known as olive scab and leaf spot and is widespread in all the major olive growing regions of the world (Obanor et al. 2005). Symptoms have been found to occur mainly on leaves and appear as dark green to black spots surrounded by a yellow halo similar to the eye spot on peacock’s feathers; hence, the name peacock spot (Graniti 1993; Shabi et al....
Pseudocercospora cladosporioides on olive berries in Australia

Pseudocercospora cladosporioides on olive berries in Australia

V. Sergeeva, U. Braun, R. Spooner-Hart and N. G. Nair | View Article Pseudocercospora cladosporioides (Sacc.) U.Braun (syn. Cercospora cladosporioides, Mycocentrospora cladosporioides) is a common widespread leaf spot disease of olives in most olive growing regions in the world. Cercospora leaf spot of olives has been attributed to P. cladosporioides in Australia (A´ vila et al. 2005). In May 2006, we found P. cladosporioides on berries of olives (Olea europaea) in Australia for the first time. It was isolated from berries of the cultivar FS-17 at harvest at an olive grove in Menangle, New South Wales (3470S; 150440E) (material deposited at the Herbarium of the Martin Luther University, No. 1925 F). The fungus causes small brown sunken spots with greenish boundaries on the surface of the berries (Fig. 1). Infected berries showed signs of rotting. The spots showed the presence of conidiophores and conidia fully agreeing with those on infected leaves where it is commonly found. P. cladosporioides is recognisable by having conidia formed singly, more or less cylindrical, (25–)30–65(–95)3–5 mm, (1–)3–5(–7)-septate, very pale to medium olivaceous-brown, with obtuse apex and obconically truncate or subtruncate base (A´ vila et al. 2005). P. cladosporioides has been found on olive berries in Spain (del Moral de la Vega and Medina Cabezas...
Evidence of early flower infection in olives causing anthracnose disease

Evidence of early flower infection in olives causing anthracnose disease

Vera Sergeeva and Robert Spooner-Hart | View Article We present new evidence for early asymptomatic infection of flowers of olive varieties Barnea and Manzanillo by Colletotrichum acutatum J.H. Simmonds and C. gloeosporioides (Penzig.) Penzig & Saccardo, in Australia. Incubation of the surface-sterilized flowers showed that they were infected from early stages of flowering until fruit set and that the fungi were present in calyx, petals, stamens and pistil. In some instances the pedicels were also...
First report of Colletotrichum acutatum and C. gloeosporioides causing leaf spots

First report of Colletotrichum acutatum and C. gloeosporioides causing leaf spots

V. Sergeeva, R. Spooner-Hart and N. G. Nair | View Article Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum acutatum and C. gloeosporioides is a common and widespread fruit rot disease of olives (Olea europaea L.) in most olive growing regions in the world. The first record of C. gloeosporioides on olive fruit in Australia was from Wagga Wagga, NSW, in 1969 (DAR 17788) and that of C. acutatum on fruit at both Roseberry, NSW(DAR 64937) and Parramatta,NSW(DAR 65049) in 1989. We report the occurrence of anthracnose caused by C. acutatum and C. gloeosporioides on leaves of olives (Olea europaea) for the first time in...